Faustian Pacts: Stingy Jack: The Man Who Stole the Devil’s Wallet

The Devil has often been portrayed in Christian narrative as a malicious trickster, delighting in trapping his victins in the fiery pits of Hell, eternally tormenting them without mercy. But apart from being a nightmarish figure striking terror, in some tales he’s also foolish and naive in a most charming and funny fashion. The following blog post offers us such a humorous story.

Under the influence!

This All Hallow’s Read is a re-telling of an Irish folktale for Enchanted Conversation Magazine, by zteve t evans, published as ALL HALLOW’S READ – Stingy Jack: The Man Who Stole the Devil’s Wallet, 14th October 2019. It tells of the infamous, Stingy Jack, (also known as Jack the Smith, Flaky Jack, or Jack of the Lantern)- a character associated with Halloween. The pumpkin jack-o-lantern may have derived from this colorful character and his interaction with the Prince of Darkness.

Stingy Jack

Way back in old Ireland several centuries ago, there was a well known character in many towns and villages across the country known as Stingy Jack. He had a silver tongue and could be very persuasive and charming yet was unquestionably a drunkard, trickster, blaggard and a man of all round devious character. 

According to legend, the Devil heard all about Jack’s tricks and deviousness and decided…

View original post 219 more words

Faery song

Fairies in mythology have always been associated with both magic and ambivalent behaviour towards humans. A significant part of their culture centres on music and the power of rhymes and songs. This blog post explores how fairies have used the magical property of their songs to both enthrall and save humans by cursing them or bestowing their blessings upon them.

British Fairies

waterhouse siren 

A siren, J W Waterhouse

I have written before of the fairies’ love of music (known as fonn-sith in Scotland) and of song.  Songs are more, though, than just entertainment: they are magical.

The special status of song in fairy culture is demonstrated extremely well in a story from Highland Scotland.  Angus Mór of Tomnahurich was a shepherd.  He heard music coming from a fairy knoll, accompanied by the voice of his wife-to-be singing.  Approaching the knoll, he peeped in but couldn’t see her.  A fairy woman happened to be passing by so he seized her with his iron-tipped crook and demanded to know what was happening.  She told him that he would only be able to save his intended if, at the end of that week, he could tell the fairy queen’s secret on the Bridge of Easan Dubh (the Black Falls).  Seven days later Angus…

View original post 966 more words