Protected: The Fruit of Passion: Chapter 30 – Part II

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

Five Trees Featured in Celtic Lore

The ancient Celtic tribes were devout believers in the cosmic oneness of the universe, and held the belief that nature and even objects many times were ensouled. An example of such a notion can be found if one examines the trees the Celts considered sacred.

Featuring in their religious rites, everyday life and mythology, they were endowned with medicinal, magical, spiritual and otherwordly properties. This posts explores five such trees that played a significant role in the lives of the Celts.

Under the influence!

Image by mbll from Pixabay

This article was first published on 21st January 2021 on #FolkloreThursday.com under the title Top 5 Trees in Celtic Mythology, Legend and Folklore by zteve t evans.

Animists

It is believed that the ancient Celtic people were animists who considered all objects to have consciousness of some kind. This included trees, and each species of tree had different properties which might be medicinal, spiritual or symbolic. Of course, wood was also used for everyday needs such as fire wood and making shelters, spears, arrows, staffs and many other items. Trees also supplied nuts and berries for themselves and their animals as food. Some species of tree featured in stories from their myths, legends and folklore and presented here are five trees that played an important role in these tales and lore.

Oak Trees

The oak was the king of the forest having many associations throughout…

View original post 267 more words

Protected: The Fruit of Passion: Chapter 30 – Part I

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

Welsh Celtic Lore: The Mabinogi of Branwen, Daughter of Llŷr Retold

The Welsh, through the prose collection of the Mabinogion, have presented to the world a singular artistic creation that offers a charming panorama of fantasy, romance, adventure, tragedy, humour and satire wrapped up in a net full of otherwordly magic and allure.

This blog post explores one of the four branches of the Mabinogion, the story of the British princess, Branwen, and the war of her family against her Irish husband and his warriors. A tale of high-octane poignancy, it offers to the reader a wide cast of characters, each one larger than life and full of complexity.

Under the influence!

Presented here is a retelling of the second branch of the Four Branches of the Mabinogi known as Branwen ferch Llŷr (“Branwen Daughter of Llŷr”).  The name Branwen means “white, blessed raven.” (1)

The Second Branch of the Mabinogi

Brân the Blessed, son of Llŷr, was king of the island of Britain that was also known as the Island of the Mighty. He had a brother named Manawyddan who was also a son of Llŷr and a sister named Branwen who was Llŷr’s daughter. These three Brân, Manawyddan, and Branwen are sometimes known as the Children ofLlŷr. They are not the same as the Children of Lir, from Irish mythology although there may be distant associations or connections. In this story Brânwas a personage of such gigantic stature no building existed that could contain him.

View original post 3,395 more words

Protected: The Fruit of Passion: Chapter 29 – Part II

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

Protected: The Fruit of Passion: Chapter 29 – Part I

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

Welsh Celtic Lore: The Adar Rhiannon – The Singing Birds of Rhiannon

The Mabinogion, a collection comprised of the earliest prose stories of the literature of Britain, written in Middle Welsh, is a fascinating melange of mythology, folkore and history. In its pages, one can find themselves immersed in a world of magic, floating between the fringes of the human realm and the Otherworld. Both worlds are inhabited by characters larger than life: gods and heroes sprung from the depths of an extraordinary, distant past.

One such figure is the otherwordly woman Rhiannon, whom the scholars have identified as the goddess of sovereignty. Many supernatural incidents accompany her throughout her presence in the tales, one of the most intriguing that of her association with her three magic birds.

This post explores their role, abilities and significance in the tales in which they appear.

Under the influence!

The Adar Rhiannon – The Singing Birds of Rhiannon by zteve t evans – 18 January 2021

The Birds of Rhiannon

Welsh mythology and folklore is crammed with fantastical people and creatures and the Adar Rhiannon, or the Birds of Rhiannon, are a trio of magical birds mentioned in early Welsh literature and myth. They were associated with Rhiannon who many scholars see as goddess from the Welsh Celtic Otherworld. She was a significant figure in the First and Third Branches of the Mabinogi and her birds were mentioned in the Second Branch. Presented here is a short discussion involving some of what is known about the Adar Rhiannon looking briefly at the Mabinogi and the adventure story, Culhwch and Olwen. This will be followed by a look at the mysterious Rhiannon and the properties of the magical birds in these stories and conclude by referring back to The…

View original post 1,346 more words