Wishes, Curses and a Sister Saves her Brothers: The Tale of the Seven Ravens

Under the influence!

1016px-the_seven_ravenThe Seven Ravens By H.koppdelaney (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia CommonsWe all have dreams that we wish would come true.  Sometimes we make a wish and that wish is granted but what we actually get may be the result of how we have made that wish. If we make a detrimental wish against someone or something that wish becomes a curse.  Sometimes unforeseen consequences may be unleashed that affect others who have to pay some kind of a price even though they were not the ones who did the wishing. The following is a retelling of a folktale called The Seven Ravens and explores how wishes are made and how they are fulfilled and what can happen when wishes are made in haste or anger.   It appeared in  Household Tales by Brothers Grimm by Jacob Grimm and Wilhelm Grimm and is classed as Aarne-Thompson type 451…

View original post 2,105 more words

The Fairytale Heroine’s Journey — The Fairytale Heroine’s Journey

When I first started developing my ideas about the Fairytale Heroine’s Journey, I wrote an article for Faerie Magazine describing that journey and its various stages. Here is the article I wrote, in which I describe how that journey appears in a number of different tales by fairytale writers and collectors such as Charles Perrault, […]

via The Fairytale Heroine’s Journey — The Fairytale Heroine’s Journey

Supernatural Animal Helpers, the Grateful Dead and the Quest for the Bird “Grip”

Under the influence!

Preparacion_De_Wampole_(Wampole's_Preparation)_(3093618924)Bird in Cage By Miami U. Libraries – Digital Collections [No restrictions or Public domain], via Wikimedia CommonsThemes and motifs in folk and fairy tales are devices that help to enrich the story.  They are not the story-line but are woven into the narrative to enhance and highlight certain parts, or points the narrator wishes to make, or to provide an overall meaning, which is sometimes deliberately hidden.  Presented here is a retelling of a Swedish fairy tale called The Bird “Grip” whose song was said to cure blindness of kings.  This tale is classified as  Aarne-Thompson folktale type 550, “The Golden Bird”, a Supernatural Helper in the Aarne–Thompson–Uther classification system and it also involves the Grateful Dead (type 505). This is followed by a brief discussion about some of the motifs and themes that appear in the story and what they may mean.

The Quest for the…

View original post 5,896 more words